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Q300232

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 30 to 33.

Money issues aren't romantic, but they should be discussed before a wedding

By Carolyn Hax Hi, Carolyn: So, I am getting married in a few months and I've been struggling with a question: How much financial information should a couple share pre-wedding? Recently my fiancé told me that an old creditor started garnishing a portion of his paycheck. I was shocked that his finances were in such a bad state. He has always been private about money, but I didn't care much since I make my own living anyway. I'm just wondering if we need to write out all our debts and share them with each other before marriage. If so, how do I approach this topic? Anonymous You tell him the garnished paycheck surprised you, and you think it's important that both of you share full financial information − including credit scores − then fully discuss your philosophies and approaches to money. This is critical given not just his neglected debt, but also your casual attitude toward his being "private about money." If he won't share, don't marry. Seriously. And if he does share what amounts to a real mess, then postpone the wedding until he sorts himself out. This isn't about your ability to support yourself, though that helps. It's about the financial implications of the legal knot you're about to tie. Unromantic, sure, but losing a home/car, taking second or third jobs, never having a vacation and winding up in bankruptcy are all profoundly unromantic as well. (Adapted form http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/mone...)

In the sentence He has always been private about money, the Present Perfect is

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Q308750

Attention: For questions 53-60, read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

Saving energy: it starts at home We already know the fastest, 53 expensive way to slow climate change: use less energy. With a little effort, and not 54

money, most of us could reduce our energy diets by 25 percent or more − 55 the Earth a favor while also helping our pocketbooks.

So what's holding us back? Scientists have reported recently that the world is heating up even faster KK 56 predicted only a few years KK 57 , and that the

consequences could be severe if we don't KK 58 reducing emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are trapping heat in our atmosphere. But what can we KK 59 about it as individuals? Will our efforts really KK

60 any difference?

(Extracted from the National Geographic Magazine, March 2009)

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Q300237

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 34 to 40.

Our Plugged-in Summer

By BRUCE FEILER

I [TO SET OUT] to spend my summer vacation online. A few things conspired to give me the idea. The first was the insistent finger wagging one now encounters that the only way to spend quality time with one's children is to disengage from technology. The same day, my brother sent along a link for a new app (leafsnap) that allows users to identify trees by submitting photos of leaves. What a smart way to juice that nature walk, I thought. The next day I saw a Twitter message from Pierre Omidyar (@pierre), the eBay founder, in which he attached a photo and asked, "What is the name of this purple and white flower bush?" Seconds later he had his answer: lilac. Then my sister wrote to ask how she could identify the bird building a nest on her deck. "Take a picture and put it on Facebook," I said. "You'll have an answer within the hour." She bet me it wouldn't work, but within 19 minutes two friends had confirmed it was a Carolina wren. I concocted a scheme. During weekends this summer, I would pursue the opposite of an unplugged vacation: I would check screens whenever I could. Not in the service of work, but in the service of play. I would crowd-source new ideas for car games and YouTube my picnic recipes. I would test the prevailing wisdom that the Internet spoils all the fun. With back-to-school fast approaching, here's my report. For starters, the Web supplied an endless font of trivia and historical tidbits to enliven our days. I learned that a great debate still rages over who was the "Benedict" in eggs Benedict; that ancient mythologists believed fish were so afraid of the ospreys that they turned up their bellies in surrender; and that care packages like the one we sent my nephew at camp had their origins feeding starving Europeans in World War II. Online videos are another boon to summer. When my 6-year-old daughters were upset that we didn't awaken them at midnight to watch a brief light show on the Eiffel Tower, a quick trip to YouTube did the trick. My father used seaturtle.org to teach my girls how sea turtles emerge from the Atlantic near our home on Tybee Island, Ga., and lay eggs. Injured turtles are implanted with G.P.S. devices, allowing them to be tracked online. One surprising way that being plugged in improved our vacations was using newfangled resources to solve oldfangled problems. Bugs, for one. I used the Internet to find a home remedy for the slugs eating my begonias (broken eggshells). The Web also helped give us the feeling that we saw people more than we did. While it's fashionable to complain that we're overly connected, I still found an occasional, virtual interaction with a friend or family member to be as pleasant as running into them on the beach. I texted with my 12-year-old nephew about geocaching when we get together. My kids Skyped with my parents about learning to swim. And our devices were lifesavers when my daughter Tybee took a spill and had to be hurried to the hospital for stitches. A friend who took care of Tybee's twin, Eden, e-mailed us a photo of her noshing on pizza to assure us she was fine. When Tybee got nervous, the doctor asked her what movies she should download on her iPad for her son. And just before the procedure, I received a heartwarming text: "Dear Tybee, you are such a brave girl, love Eden."

(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/fashion/this-lif...)

The underlined verb had, as used in the last paragraph, can be replaced, without any change in meaning, by

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Q300236

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 34 to 40.

Our Plugged-in Summer

By BRUCE FEILER

I [TO SET OUT] to spend my summer vacation online. A few things conspired to give me the idea. The first was the insistent finger wagging one now encounters that the only way to spend quality time with one's children is to disengage from technology. The same day, my brother sent along a link for a new app (leafsnap) that allows users to identify trees by submitting photos of leaves. What a smart way to juice that nature walk, I thought. The next day I saw a Twitter message from Pierre Omidyar (@pierre), the eBay founder, in which he attached a photo and asked, "What is the name of this purple and white flower bush?" Seconds later he had his answer: lilac. Then my sister wrote to ask how she could identify the bird building a nest on her deck. "Take a picture and put it on Facebook," I said. "You'll have an answer within the hour." She bet me it wouldn't work, but within 19 minutes two friends had confirmed it was a Carolina wren. I concocted a scheme. During weekends this summer, I would pursue the opposite of an unplugged vacation: I would check screens whenever I could. Not in the service of work, but in the service of play. I would crowd-source new ideas for car games and YouTube my picnic recipes. I would test the prevailing wisdom that the Internet spoils all the fun. With back-to-school fast approaching, here's my report. For starters, the Web supplied an endless font of trivia and historical tidbits to enliven our days. I learned that a great debate still rages over who was the "Benedict" in eggs Benedict; that ancient mythologists believed fish were so afraid of the ospreys that they turned up their bellies in surrender; and that care packages like the one we sent my nephew at camp had their origins feeding starving Europeans in World War II. Online videos are another boon to summer. When my 6-year-old daughters were upset that we didn't awaken them at midnight to watch a brief light show on the Eiffel Tower, a quick trip to YouTube did the trick. My father used seaturtle.org to teach my girls how sea turtles emerge from the Atlantic near our home on Tybee Island, Ga., and lay eggs. Injured turtles are implanted with G.P.S. devices, allowing them to be tracked online. One surprising way that being plugged in improved our vacations was using newfangled resources to solve oldfangled problems. Bugs, for one. I used the Internet to find a home remedy for the slugs eating my begonias (broken eggshells). The Web also helped give us the feeling that we saw people more than we did. While it's fashionable to complain that we're overly connected, I still found an occasional, virtual interaction with a friend or family member to be as pleasant as running into them on the beach. I texted with my 12-year-old nephew about geocaching when we get together. My kids Skyped with my parents about learning to swim. And our devices were lifesavers when my daughter Tybee took a spill and had to be hurried to the hospital for stitches. A friend who took care of Tybee's twin, Eden, e-mailed us a photo of her noshing on pizza to assure us she was fine. When Tybee got nervous, the doctor asked her what movies she should download on her iPad for her son. And just before the procedure, I received a heartwarming text: "Dear Tybee, you are such a brave girl, love Eden."

(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/fashion/this-lif...)

The modal could as used in how she could identify the bird indicates

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Q300231

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 30 to 33.

Money issues aren't romantic, but they should be discussed before a wedding

By Carolyn Hax

Hi, Carolyn:

So, I am getting married in a few months and I've been struggling with a question: How much financial information should a couple share pre-wedding? Recently my fiancé told me that an old creditor started garnishing a portion of his paycheck. I was shocked that his finances were in such a bad state. He has always been private about money, but I didn't care much since I make my own living anyway. I'm just wondering if we need to write out all our debts and share them with each other before marriage. If so, how do I approach this topic? Anonymous You tell him the garnished paycheck surprised you, and you think it's important that both of you share full financial information − including credit scores − then fully discuss your philosophies and approaches to money. This is critical given not just his neglected debt, but also your casual attitude toward his being "private about money." If he won't share, don't marry. Seriously. And if he does share what amounts to a real mess, then postpone the wedding until he sorts himself out. This isn't about your ability to support yourself, though that helps. It's about the financial implications of the legal knot you're about to tie. Unromantic, sure, but losing a home/car, taking second or third jobs, never having a vacation and winding up in bankruptcy are all profoundly unromantic as well.

(Adapted form http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/mone...)

A synonym for the adjective private, as used in the text, is

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Q300235

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 34 to 40.

Our Plugged-in Summer

By BRUCE FEILER

I [TO SET OUT] to spend my summer vacation online. A few things conspired to give me the idea. The first was the insistent finger wagging one now encounters that the only way to spend quality time with one's children is to disengage from technology. The same day, my brother sent along a link for a new app (leafsnap) that allows users to identify trees by submitting photos of leaves. What a smart way to juice that nature walk, I thought. The next day I saw a Twitter message from Pierre Omidyar (@pierre), the eBay founder, in which he attached a photo and asked, "What is the name of this purple and white flower bush?" Seconds later he had his answer: lilac. Then my sister wrote to ask how she could identify the bird building a nest on her deck. "Take a picture and put it on Facebook," I said. "You'll have an answer within the hour." She bet me it wouldn't work, but within 19 minutes two friends had confirmed it was a Carolina wren. I concocted a scheme. During weekends this summer, I would pursue the opposite of an unplugged vacation: I would check screens whenever I could. Not in the service of work, but in the service of play. I would crowd-source new ideas for car games and YouTube my picnic recipes. I would test the prevailing wisdom that the Internet spoils all the fun. With back-to-school fast approaching, here's my report. For starters, the Web supplied an endless font of trivia and historical tidbits to enliven our days. I learned that a great debate still rages over who was the "Benedict" in eggs Benedict; that ancient mythologists believed fish were so afraid of the ospreys that they turned up their bellies in surrender; and that care packages like the one we sent my nephew at camp had their origins feeding starving Europeans in World War II. Online videos are another boon to summer. When my 6-year-old daughters were upset that we didn't awaken them at midnight to watch a brief light show on the Eiffel Tower, a quick trip to YouTube did the trick. My father used seaturtle.org to teach my girls how sea turtles emerge from the Atlantic near our home on Tybee Island, Ga., and lay eggs. Injured turtles are implanted with G.P.S. devices, allowing them to be tracked online. One surprising way that being plugged in improved our vacations was using newfangled resources to solve oldfangled problems. Bugs, for one. I used the Internet to find a home remedy for the slugs eating my begonias (broken eggshells). The Web also helped give us the feeling that we saw people more than we did. While it's fashionable to complain that we're overly connected, I still found an occasional, virtual interaction with a friend or family member to be as pleasant as running into them on the beach. I texted with my 12-year-old nephew about geocaching when we get together. My kids Skyped with my parents about learning to swim. And our devices were lifesavers when my daughter Tybee took a spill and had to be hurried to the hospital for stitches. A friend who took care of Tybee's twin, Eden, e-mailed us a photo of her noshing on pizza to assure us she was fine. When Tybee got nervous, the doctor asked her what movies she should download on her iPad for her son. And just before the procedure, I received a heartwarming text: "Dear Tybee, you are such a brave girl, love Eden."

(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/fashion/this-lif...)

The correct form of [TO SET OUT] is

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Q300239

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 34 to 40.

Our Plugged-in Summer

By BRUCE FEILER

I [TO SET OUT] to spend my summer vacation online. A few things conspired to give me the idea. The first was the insistent finger wagging one now encounters that the only way to spend quality time with one's children is to disengage from technology. The same day, my brother sent along a link for a new app (leafsnap) that allows users to identify trees by submitting photos of leaves. What a smart way to juice that nature walk, I thought. The next day I saw a Twitter message from Pierre Omidyar (@pierre), the eBay founder, in which he attached a photo and asked, "What is the name of this purple and white flower bush?" Seconds later he had his answer: lilac. Then my sister wrote to ask how she could identify the bird building a nest on her deck. "Take a picture and put it on Facebook," I said. "You'll have an answer within the hour." She bet me it wouldn't work, but within 19 minutes two friends had confirmed it was a Carolina wren. I concocted a scheme. During weekends this summer, I would pursue the opposite of an unplugged vacation: I would check screens whenever I could. Not in the service of work, but in the service of play. I would crowd-source new ideas for car games and YouTube my picnic recipes. I would test the prevailing wisdom that the Internet spoils all the fun. With back-to-school fast approaching, here's my report. For starters, the Web supplied an endless font of trivia and historical tidbits to enliven our days. I learned that a great debate still rages over who was the "Benedict" in eggs Benedict; that ancient mythologists believed fish were so afraid of the ospreys that they turned up their bellies in surrender; and that care packages like the one we sent my nephew at camp had their origins feeding starving Europeans in World War II. Online videos are another boon to summer. When my 6-year-old daughters were upset that we didn't awaken them at midnight to watch a brief light show on the Eiffel Tower, a quick trip to YouTube did the trick. My father used seaturtle.org to teach my girls how sea turtles emerge from the Atlantic near our home on Tybee Island, Ga., and lay eggs. Injured turtles are implanted with G.P.S. devices, allowing them to be tracked online. One surprising way that being plugged in improved our vacations was using newfangled resources to solve oldfangled problems. Bugs, for one. I used the Internet to find a home remedy for the slugs eating my begonias (broken eggshells). The Web also helped give us the feeling that we saw people more than we did. While it's fashionable to complain that we're overly connected, I still found an occasional, virtual interaction with a friend or family member to be as pleasant as running into them on the beach. I texted with my 12-year-old nephew about geocaching when we get together. My kids Skyped with my parents about learning to swim. And our devices were lifesavers when my daughter Tybee took a spill and had to be hurried to the hospital for stitches. A friend who took care of Tybee's twin, Eden, e-mailed us a photo of her noshing on pizza to assure us she was fine. When Tybee got nervous, the doctor asked her what movies she should download on her iPad for her son. And just before the procedure, I received a heartwarming text: "Dear Tybee, you are such a brave girl, love Eden."

(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/fashion/this-lif...)

Infere-se do texto que

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Q300246

What is the correct sequence?

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Q300234

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 30 to 33.

Money issues aren't romantic, but they should be discussed before a wedding

By Carolyn Hax Hi, Carolyn: So, I am getting married in a few months and I've been struggling with a question: How much financial information should a couple share pre-wedding? Recently my fiancé told me that an old creditor started garnishing a portion of his paycheck. I was shocked that his finances were in such a bad state. He has always been private about money, but I didn't care much since I make my own living anyway. I'm just wondering if we need to write out all our debts and share them with each other before marriage. If so, how do I approach this topic? Anonymous You tell him the garnished paycheck surprised you, and you think it's important that both of you share full financial information − including credit scores − then fully discuss your philosophies and approaches to money. This is critical given not just his neglected debt, but also your casual attitude toward his being "private about money." If he won't share, don't marry. Seriously. And if he does share what amounts to a real mess, then postpone the wedding until he sorts himself out. This isn't about your ability to support yourself, though that helps. It's about the financial implications of the legal knot you're about to tie. Unromantic, sure, but losing a home/car, taking second or third jobs, never having a vacation and winding up in bankruptcy are all profoundly unromantic as well. (Adapted form http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/mone...)

According to the text,

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Q308752

Attention: For questions 53-60, read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

Saving energy: it starts at home We already know the fastest, 53 expensive way to slow climate change: use less energy. With a little effort, and not 54

money, most of us could reduce our energy diets by 25 percent or more − 55 the Earth a favor while also helping our pocketbooks.

So what's holding us back? Scientists have reported recently that the world is heating up even faster KK 56 predicted only a few years KK 57 , and that the

consequences could be severe if we don't KK 58 reducing emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are trapping heat in our atmosphere. But what can we KK 59 about it as individuals? Will our efforts really KK

60 any difference?

(Extracted from the National Geographic Magazine, March 2009)

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Q300241

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 34 to 40.

Our Plugged-in Summer

By BRUCE FEILER

I [TO SET OUT] to spend my summer vacation online. A few things conspired to give me the idea. The first was the insistent finger wagging one now encounters that the only way to spend quality time with one's children is to disengage from technology. The same day, my brother sent along a link for a new app (leafsnap) that allows users to identify trees by submitting photos of leaves. What a smart way to juice that nature walk, I thought. The next day I saw a Twitter message from Pierre Omidyar (@pierre), the eBay founder, in which he attached a photo and asked, "What is the name of this purple and white flower bush?" Seconds later he had his answer: lilac. Then my sister wrote to ask how she could identify the bird building a nest on her deck. "Take a picture and put it on Facebook," I said. "You'll have an answer within the hour." She bet me it wouldn't work, but within 19 minutes two friends had confirmed it was a Carolina wren. I concocted a scheme. During weekends this summer, I would pursue the opposite of an unplugged vacation: I would check screens whenever I could. Not in the service of work, but in the service of play. I would crowd-source new ideas for car games and YouTube my picnic recipes. I would test the prevailing wisdom that the Internet spoils all the fun. With back-to-school fast approaching, here's my report. For starters, the Web supplied an endless font of trivia and historical tidbits to enliven our days. I learned that a great debate still rages over who was the "Benedict" in eggs Benedict; that ancient mythologists believed fish were so afraid of the ospreys that they turned up their bellies in surrender; and that care packages like the one we sent my nephew at camp had their origins feeding starving Europeans in World War II. Online videos are another boon to summer. When my 6-year-old daughters were upset that we didn't awaken them at midnight to watch a brief light show on the Eiffel Tower, a quick trip to YouTube did the trick. My father used seaturtle.org to teach my girls how sea turtles emerge from the Atlantic near our home on Tybee Island, Ga., and lay eggs. Injured turtles are implanted with G.P.S. devices, allowing them to be tracked online. One surprising way that being plugged in improved our vacations was using newfangled resources to solve oldfangled problems. Bugs, for one. I used the Internet to find a home remedy for the slugs eating my begonias (broken eggshells). The Web also helped give us the feeling that we saw people more than we did. While it's fashionable to complain that we're overly connected, I still found an occasional, virtual interaction with a friend or family member to be as pleasant as running into them on the beach. I texted with my 12-year-old nephew about geocaching when we get together. My kids Skyped with my parents about learning to swim. And our devices were lifesavers when my daughter Tybee took a spill and had to be hurried to the hospital for stitches. A friend who took care of Tybee's twin, Eden, e-mailed us a photo of her noshing on pizza to assure us she was fine. When Tybee got nervous, the doctor asked her what movies she should download on her iPad for her son. And just before the procedure, I received a heartwarming text: "Dear Tybee, you are such a brave girl, love Eden."

(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/fashion/this-lif...)

Um fecho adequado para o texto seria

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Q308718

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 21 to 29.

A Writer's Beginnings in Kenya By ALEXANDRA FULLER

ONE DAY I WILL WRITE ABOUT THIS PLACE

A Memoir By Binyavanga Wainaina 256 pp. Graywolf Press. $24.

Dear reader, I'll save you precious time: skip this review and head directly to the bookstore for Binyavanga Wainaina's stand-upand-cheer coming-of-age memoir, "One Day I Will Write About This Place." [CONNECTIVE] written by an East African and set in East and Southern Africa, Wainaina's book is not just for Afrophiles or lovers of post-colonial literature. This is a book for anyone who still finds the nourishment of a well-written tale preferable to the empty-calorie jolt of a celebrity confessional or Swedish mystery. Not that Wainaina is likely to judge [PRONOUN] taste in books. In fact, at its heart, this is a story about how Wainaina was almost [TO EAT] alive by his addiction to reading anything available. "I am starting to read storybooks," he says of his 11-year-old self, growing up in Nakuru, Kenya. "If words, in English, arranged on the page have the power to control my body in this world, this sound and language can close its folds, like a fan, and I will slide into its world, where things are arranged differently." As he leaves childhood [ADVERB 1] − "My nose sweats a lot these days, and my armpits smell, and I wake [ADVERB 2] a lot at night all wriggly and hot, like Congo rumba music" − Wainaina retreats further from the confusing realities of politics and adolescence and his big multinational family (his father a Kenyan businessman and farm owner, his mother a Ugandan salon owner) and deeper into a world of words. At school he is told, and believes, that he is supposed to become a doctor or a lawyer, an engineer or a scientist. But Wainaina seems constitutionally incapable of absorbing anything that would further a career in these fields. By the time Wainaina leaves Kenya to attend university in South Africa, a country smoldering with the last poisonous fumes of apartheid, his addiction to books is complete. He drops out of school to pursue more completely a life of reading.

Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/14/books/review/one-day-i-will-write-about-this-place-by-binyavanga-wainaina-book-review.html?pagewanted=all)

The word head, as used in the text, belongs to which of the following groups?

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Q308756

Attention: For questions 53-60, read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

Saving energy: it starts at home We already know the fastest, 53 expensive way to slow climate change: use less energy. With a little effort, and not 54

money, most of us could reduce our energy diets by 25 percent or more − 55 the Earth a favor while also helping our pocketbooks.

So what's holding us back? Scientists have reported recently that the world is heating up even faster KK 56 predicted only a few years KK 57 , and that the

consequences could be severe if we don't KK 58 reducing emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are trapping heat in our atmosphere. But what can we KK 59 about it as individuals? Will our efforts really KK

60 any difference?

(Extracted from the National Geographic Magazine, March 2009)

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Q300233

Attention: Read the text and answer questions 30 to 33.

Money issues aren't romantic, but they should be discussed before a wedding

By Carolyn Hax Hi, Carolyn: So, I am getting married in a few months and I've been struggling with a question: How much financial information should a couple share pre-wedding? Recently my fiancé told me that an old creditor started garnishing a portion of his paycheck. I was shocked that his finances were in such a bad state. He has always been private about money, but I didn't care much since I make my own living anyway. I'm just wondering if we need to write out all our debts and share them with each other before marriage. If so, how do I approach this topic? Anonymous You tell him the garnished paycheck surprised you, and you think it's important that both of you share full financial information − including credit scores − then fully discuss your philosophies and approaches to money. This is critical given not just his neglected debt, but also your casual attitude toward his being "private about money." If he won't share, don't marry. Seriously. And if he does share what amounts to a real mess, then postpone the wedding until he sorts himself out. This isn't about your ability to support yourself, though that helps. It's about the financial implications of the legal knot you're about to tie. Unromantic, sure, but losing a home/car, taking second or third jobs, never having a vacation and winding up in bankruptcy are all profoundly unromantic as well. (Adapted form http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/mone...)

According to the text, Carolyn

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Q308751

Attention: For questions 53-60, read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

Saving energy: it starts at home We already know the fastest, 53 expensive way to slow climate change: use less energy. With a little effort, and not 54

money, most of us could reduce our energy diets by 25 percent or more − 55 the Earth a favor while also helping our pocketbooks.

So what's holding us back? Scientists have reported recently that the world is heating up even faster KK 56 predicted only a few years KK 57 , and that the

consequences could be severe if we don't KK 58 reducing emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are trapping heat in our atmosphere. But what can we KK 59 about it as individuals? Will our efforts really KK

60 any difference?

(Extracted from the National Geographic Magazine, March 2009)

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GABARITO:

  • 1) C
  • 2) A
  • 3) A
  • 4) D
  • 5) D
  • 6) A
  • 7) C
  • 8) A
  • 9) C
  • 10) C
  • 11) A
  • 12) D
  • 13) D
  • 14) B
  • 15) C
  •  
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